Edifying in curious letters

A pursuit of all things intellectual, moral, and spiritual (with an occasional touch of humor)


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Reblogged from mothernaturenetwork
mothernaturenetwork:

9 of the most interesting inventions of 2014From medical advances to an energy-efficient computer mouse, here are some of the coolest inventions to debut in 2014.

mothernaturenetwork:

9 of the most interesting inventions of 2014
From medical advances to an energy-efficient computer mouse, here are some of the coolest inventions to debut in 2014.

Reblogged from fastcompany
Most people make their decisions about their life and careers from emotion and assumptions. Successful entrepreneurs base their decisions from fact-based thinking. How To Think Like An Entrepreneur, Even When You’re Not One (via fastcompany)

(via fastcompany)

Reblogged from yeahwriters
This is the language of privilege – the audacity of standing at the top of a mountain you made on the backs of others and then yelling at people for being at the bottom. If it’s not the intangible Market that’s to blame, it’s the writers of color, who maybe don’t have what it takes and don’t submit enough anyway. Read the subtextual coding here – the agent first places the onus of change on the folks with the least institutional power to effect it, then suggests we probably won’t be able to find the time (i.e., lazy) to master the craft.

—Daniel José Older, “Diversity is Not Enough: Race, Power, Publishing

This is a great piece, despite being so frustrating/disheartening.

It’s also a pretty good index of several other major pieces written abotu diversity in publishing.

(via yeahwriters)
Reblogged from emergentfutures
Reblogged from txchnologist

txchnologist:

Meet The CHIMP

Carnegie Mellon University’s Highly Intelligent Mobile Platform took third place in last December’s DARPA Robotics Challenge. The team behind the four-limbed highly capable bot will compete against others during this December’s Finals.

DARPA is sponsoring the challenge to develop robots that can help humans respond to natural and man-made disasters in human-built environments. So the machines must be able to navigate very complex, dangerous situations. 

The 50-member CMU team, called Tartan Rescue, built the five-foot-two-inch, 400-pound robot in a bit over a year. They have already been awarded $3 million by DARPA to build CHIMP, and stand to win $2 million if they win the Finals.

Read More

(via emergentfutures)

Reblogged from futomato

yeahwriters:

fuckinstoned:

skateeverydamnday:

rizelkahle:

angelicasucks:

YAAAASSSS

GOD FUCKING BLESS THIS WOMAN

THANK YOU!!!!

Wow

FUCKYAAAAAA

This is fundamentally one of the most important issues facing this country.

(Source: futomato, via yeahwriters)

Reblogged from futomato

yeahwriters:

fuckinstoned:

skateeverydamnday:

rizelkahle:

angelicasucks:

YAAAASSSS

GOD FUCKING BLESS THIS WOMAN

THANK YOU!!!!

Wow

FUCKYAAAAAA

(Source: futomato, via yeahwriters)

Reblogged from fastcompany
fastcompany:

Nissan’s self-cleaning paint could end the era of car scrubbing.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Nissan’s self-cleaning paint could end the era of car scrubbing.

Read More>

Reblogged from ucsdhealthsciences
ucsdhealthsciences:

Y you can stop worrying
For quite some time, researchers, media and possibly some misandrists have pondered the shrinking Y chromosome and the fate of men.
The Y chromosome, of course, is the chromosome that carries the directions for forming testes and making sperm, traits that sort of fundamentally define the male of the species and ensure continued reproduction.
But the Y chromosome has been getting smaller over the last several hundred million years as it has mysteriously shed genes. It now boasts just 19 compared to the roughly 600 genes it once boasted alongside the now-much-larger X chromosome. In a 2004 series, Joe Palca at NPR wondered if the incredibly shrinking Y was a harbinger for the eventual end of men.
Palca was not alone.
Relax, fellows. According to new research published in Nature, the dispiriting diminution of Y has ceased. Sure, it’s the undisputed runt of the chromosome family but it hasn’t gotten any runty-er for the past 25 million years, which is something.
The reason may be that the Y has nothing left to lose. Or at least nothing to lose that wouldn’t result in catastrophic consequences for all humanity. All of the remaining Y genes, biologist David Page told Scientific American, are crucial to human survival. They do important, basic jobs like directing the construction of proteins or how to splice RNA together. “These are powerful players in the central command room of cells,” Page said.
So heave a sigh for the Y, guys. Small but mighty is a whole lot better than being an ex-chromosome.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Y you can stop worrying

For quite some time, researchers, media and possibly some misandrists have pondered the shrinking Y chromosome and the fate of men.

The Y chromosome, of course, is the chromosome that carries the directions for forming testes and making sperm, traits that sort of fundamentally define the male of the species and ensure continued reproduction.

But the Y chromosome has been getting smaller over the last several hundred million years as it has mysteriously shed genes. It now boasts just 19 compared to the roughly 600 genes it once boasted alongside the now-much-larger X chromosome. In a 2004 series, Joe Palca at NPR wondered if the incredibly shrinking Y was a harbinger for the eventual end of men.

Palca was not alone.

Relax, fellows. According to new research published in Nature, the dispiriting diminution of Y has ceased. Sure, it’s the undisputed runt of the chromosome family but it hasn’t gotten any runty-er for the past 25 million years, which is something.

The reason may be that the Y has nothing left to lose. Or at least nothing to lose that wouldn’t result in catastrophic consequences for all humanity. All of the remaining Y genes, biologist David Page told Scientific American, are crucial to human survival. They do important, basic jobs like directing the construction of proteins or how to splice RNA together. “These are powerful players in the central command room of cells,” Page said.

So heave a sigh for the Y, guys. Small but mighty is a whole lot better than being an ex-chromosome.

Reblogged from freshphotons